Researchers have discovered and documented critical weaknesses in WPA2, a protocol that secures all modern protected Wi-Fi networks. The attack, dubbed KRACK (Key Reinstallation Attacks), allows attackers within range of the target wifi network to view seemingly “protected” information; and possibly “inject and manipulate” information, as well.

If you are using WPA2, you are affected, and if you’re using Linux or Android systems, the researchers say these attacks are particularly catastrophic.

The following CVEs should be of note:

  • CVE-2017-13077: Reinstallation of the pairwise encryption key (PTK-TK) in the 4-way handshake.
  • CVE-2017-13078: Reinstallation of the group key (GTK) in the 4-way handshake.
  • CVE-2017-13079: Reinstallation of the integrity group key (IGTK) in the 4-way handshake.
  • CVE-2017-13080: Reinstallation of the group key (GTK) in the group key handshake.
  • CVE-2017-13081: Reinstallation of the integrity group key (IGTK) in the group key handshake.
  • CVE-2017-13082: Accepting a retransmitted Fast BSS Transition (FT) Reassociation Request and reinstalling the pairwise encryption key (PTK-TK) while processing it.
  • CVE-2017-13084: Reinstallation of the STK key in the PeerKey handshake.
  • CVE-2017-13086: Reinstallation of the Tunneled Direct-Link Setup (TDLS) PeerKey (TPK) key in the TDLS handshake.
  • CVE-2017-13087: Reinstallation of the group key (GTK) when processing a Wireless Network Management (WNM) Sleep Mode Response frame.
  • CVE-2017-13088: Reinstallation of the integrity group key (IGTK) when processing a Wireless Network Management (WNM) Sleep Mode Response frame.

For a demonstration of this attack against an Android phone, click here. I have attached a PDF detailing the research, or if you prefer it can be downloaded from here.

Binary Defense recommends installing the updates/patches to address these vulnerabilities as soon as they are available.